Oil Is the Biggest Source of Greenhouse Gas Pollution in the U.S.

Takeaway: we need to focus not just on coal and gas, but also on reducing carbon pollution from vehicles.
  • Oil accounted for 43% of U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) pollution in 2015, exceeding both coal and natural gas, which each accounted for 28%.

  • In 2016, natural gas is expected to emit more GHGs than coal for the first time since 1978.

Study: Coal Production and Burning Results In At Least $150 Billion in Non-Climate Damages Each Year

Takeaway: even coal's non-climate damages is reason significant action to reduce coal consumption.
  • A 2010 study finds that between $150 and $300 billion in annual negative impacts result from air and water pollution in Kentucky, West Virginia, and many other states.

  • These costs are not currently factored into the price of electricity from coalif they were, electricity prices would roughly double.

  • The study indicates that these damages are conservative, as many other pollution sources were left out of the analysis.

China is the Biggest Current Climate Polluter, but the U.S. is the Largest Historical Climate Polluter

Takeaway: regardless, both countries must increase efforts to reduce carbon pollution.
  • Recent data show that China is the biggest current emitter of greenhouse gases (GHGs), producing 22% of the world's current annual emissions.

  • The U.S. is the biggest historical emitter (27% of the world's cumulative GHG emissions since 1850), followed by the European Union (25%) and China (11%).

  • By 2030, India's annual emissions could equal or even surpass those of the U.S, if they don't pass additional policies to reduce emissions.