Climate Choice: Reducing Global Emissions Avoids the Risk of Hurricane Sandy-Strength Storms Happening Nearly Every Year by 2050

  • A 2013 study finds that reducing global greenhouse gas emissions avoids the risk of storms with Hurricane Sandy-like strength occurring roughly every year by 2050 along coastal regions in Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and New Jersey.

  • The study shows that if no global action is taken, sea level rise will cause the annual odds of a Hurricane Sandy-strength storm hitting Atlantic City to increase from roughly 1-in-25 today to about once a year by 2050, but if we do significantly cut emissions, the odds increase to a more manageable 1-in-10.

  • Hurricane Sandy's $60 billion cost is greater than the entire proposed annual budget for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security for 2017.

Climate Choice: Reducing Emissions Can Prevent Risk of Catastrophic New York City Flooding

  • A 2016 study concludes that reducing global greenhouse gas emissions avoids the risk of three feet of global sea level rise by 2100, more than 15 feet by 2200, and over 43 feet by 2500 due to Antarctic ice melting.

  • If we were to significantly cut down emissions, the Antarctic ice sheet would likely remain stable over time, creating almost no sea level rise by 2100, and under one foot by 2500.

  • This would prevent the risk of catastrophic flooding in low-lying areas of major U.S. cities such as New York due to sea level rise.